BERLIN: STORIES OF THE WALL

On 13 August 1961 the citizens of Berlin woke up to find their city had been split in half.  After an attempt at creating the ideal separation after the end of the Second World War, there was now a wall that was more than 156 kilometres long and nearly 4 metres high.  “It was a weapon, not just a barrier, a symbol of absolutism and not just a trench, a prison rather than just a separation”.
On the night of 9 November 1989, after 28 years, and following a misunderstanding at a press conference held by Günter Schabowski, an official of the Socialist Unity Party of the German Democratic Republic, the people of the city gathered on both sides of the Wall to celebrate its collapse and the end of an era that collapsed with it.
Today, 30 years after those events, Ezio Mauro, a journalist and former editor of the Italian newspapers La Stampa and La Repubblica, as well as a writer and communicator, has created a theatrical conference which tells the story of the fall of the Communist regime, a moment which marked a historical turning point for the world that had previously been divided between East and West. He focuses on all the phases of the story, from the post-war period which split Germany into four zones managed by the four victorious allies, with more than 30 per cent of the country handed over to the Soviet Union, to the attempts by many East Germans to flee to the West, and finally the fall of the Berlin wall and what remains today in Berlin’s a memory of one of its darkest periods.
The show concludes the trilogy of theatrical conferences which Ezio Mauro has dedicated to some of the events that marked history, from the Russian Revolution, to the kidnapping of Aldo Moro, to the fall of the Berlin Wall.

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